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Scorching Phoenix Plans For An Even Hotter Future by PETER O’DOWD

A Metro Light Rail train rolls by the Devine Legacy apartment building along Central Avenue in Phoenix. The energy-efficient complex includes 65 "urban style" apartments.

Courtesy of Mica Thomas MulloyA Metro Light Rail train rolls by the Devine Legacy apartment building along Central Avenue in Phoenix. The energy-efficient complex includes 65 “urban style” apartments.

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August 14, 2012

It’s been a record hot summer in many cities across the nation. Phoenix is no exception. This Sonoran Desert metropolis already records more days over 100 degrees than any other major U.S. city. Now, climate models predict Phoenix will soon get even hotter.

A hotter future may mean a more volatile environment — and along with it, natural disasters, greater pressure on infrastructure, and an increased physical toll on city residents.

While some city planners around the country discuss ways to mitigate climate change, planners in Phoenix assume that change is already under way. Now, they are working to prepare the Phoenix metro area, and its approximately 4 million residents, for a new reality.

‘How Are We Gonna Live Here?’

The view is bleak from John Larsala’s front drive in West Phoenix. The tree in front of the house is dead, and the grass is dead, too. In fact, there’s no grass at all anymore.

On a household income of $18,000 a year, Larsala can’t afford the water charges required to keep his yard green. “All these trees are dying, because I can’t put water on it,” he says.

So Larsala’s children and their friends play basketball in the barren yard. That is, until June comes around and the blazing Phoenix summer finally forces everyone inside.

John Larsala struggles to keep his family cool during the Phoenix summer. The shade trees in his front yard have died because he cannot afford to water them.

EnlargePeter O’Dowd/KJZZJohn Larsala struggles to keep his family cool during the Phoenix summer. The shade trees in his front yard have died because he cannot afford to water them.

For three months, Larsala will shut the doors and windows tight. To save money, he soaks his kids in a cool bath and delays using the air conditioning until just before bedtime.

“Whether you are inside or whether you are outside, the heat costs you money,” Larsala says.

When told that climate scientists predict the state will get even hotter in the future, Larsala is taken aback.

“It’s going to be hotter than what it is right now? Who gonna live here? How are we gonna live here?”

Sustained Heat Waves Ahead

Phoenix actually suffers from two heat problems. One is a product of growth. Desert nights don’t cool down they way they used to, because energy from the sun is trapped in roads and buildings, a phenomenon researchers call the “urban heat island effect.”

As Phoenix grows, so does the problem, says Nancy Selover, the state climatologist.

“We keep thinking we’ll probably see a night when we only get down to 100 as a minimum temperature, which is kind of shocking,” Selover says.

Standing outside in a low-income neighborhood near Phoenix, Selover points out that many households here are using “swamp coolers,” or evaporative coolers. These cooling units are cheaper than air-conditioning — but they’re also less effective.

If Phoenix’s temperatures rise, “it’s going to be pretty unbearable,” Selover says — and without adequate cooling, potentially deadly.

Phoenix’s second problem comes from global climate change. Researchers predict it will make droughts longer and temperatures higher in the region.

Data from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program predict sustained heat waves above 114 degrees will be a yearly crisis in Phoenix by 2040. And each one, researchers project, will last a sweltering three weeks.

A Laboratory For What Works

Selover says these coming changes present Phoenix with an opportunity.

“As a desert city, Phoenix is kind of a laboratory for us to figure out what works and what doesn’t work, to try to mitigate those things.”

In the future, Selover says, “we may well have to live differently.”

Now, city officials are starting to think about what that new lifestyle might entail. One idea is to cover 25 percent of Phoenix with shade trees.

But some, like architect John Meunier, argue for much greater lifestyle adaptations.

Meunier studies pre-industrial desert cities around the world, looking for lessons to apply in modern desert cities like Phoenix.

Sitting at a light-rail stop downtown, he says creating sustainable futures in cities like this one has”everything to do with managing without having to use a lot of extra energy and power.”

To do that, Meunier says planners could encourage 10 times as many people to live around Phoenix’s light-rail stations. Getting more use out of the system would take cars — and heat — off the street.

These people would also live in taller buildings. Meunier says desert cities in Yemen, for example, take advantage of tall buildings to shade narrow streets.

“It’s crucially important. I mean, not being exposed to the direct sun’s rays makes a great big difference,” he says.

Instead of exposed front yards and backyards, older desert cities employ well-ventilated courtyards, Meunier says. Mediterranean cities paint roads and rooftops white to reflect sunlight.

It’s the way Phoenix has been built, Meunier says, that will make its residents vulnerable to rising temperatures.

“I’m not arguing that we should all live at a higher density,” Meunier says. “What I am arguing is that there’s a lot to be gained by having more of us live at higher density.”

Learning To Build Better

For Meunier’s ideas to become reality, developers will have to make the choice to build differently.

Some of them already have. Take the city’s light rail north about three miles, and you can get a close-up view of how buildings like Meunier envisions might actually work.

Felicia McMullen has lived in the energy-efficient Devine Legacy apartment building in central Phoenix since December.

EnlargeCourtesy of Mica Thomas MulloyFelicia McMullen has lived in the energy-efficient Devine Legacy apartment building in central Phoenix since December.

The Devine Legacy is a housing complex designed for people with lower incomes. Right next to the rail line, every window is dual-paned, and the building is also superinsulated. Together, those features make a typical Devine Legacy unit 40 percent more energy efficient.

Walking through the front gate leads you to a courtyard. Four-story buildings rise up on either side of you. There’s shade everywhere, and a breeze moves through the space. Even on a 113-degree day in Phoenix, it feels much cooler.

“Having a cool place to live is more important to me than food,” says resident Felicia McMullen.

Before she moved here, McMullen says she was sick and stressed. She sometimes spent $300 a month to cool her suburban home.

Now, McMullen says, “I don’t have that problem.” Her last electric bill was $60 — and the stress is gone.

Ernesto Fonseca, a planner who specializes in sustainable communities, helped test Devine Legacy’s energy use before it opened late last year.

He considers the complex a small victory in what may someday be a more complicated effort to stay cool.

“People in extreme climates learn to live with it,” Fonseca says. “And that’s part of a resilient society.”

Fonseca thinks a lot about this idea of resilience. He says it means that people who live in Phoenix must do more than try to solve the causes of escalating temperatures — they must also learn to withstand the changes as they happen.

Because, as Fonseca says, “We don’t have a choice.”

Peter O’Dowd works with the public radio collaborative FronterasRead more from their series “Heat Wave.”

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Housing prices are coming back, here’s a chart to prove it!

We can listen to reports telling us the housing market is coming back until we are blue in the face. At Cambridge Properties we are the leaders in Luxury Urban living but we’re also visual learners, so we made a graph.

 

 

What we find most interesting is that although most people are widely reporting that the uptick in housing is only due to investors picking up lower end properties, you can see that the trend in higher priced homes is going up as well.

This is good news for our clients, Cambridge Properties is the leader in Luxury urban living and it’s good to see our market is starting to come back as well!


One of the worlds most remote Amethyst mines, in Arizona?

One of our favorite show’s on the discovery channel is Dirty Jobs with Mike Rowe. Mr. Rowe has worked tons of jobs across America but one place he’s yet to visit is a remote Amethyst mine on four peaks.

Earlier this year the crew over at Sami Fine Jewelry in Fountain Hills sent someone up in a Helicopter to one of the most remote mine locations on the planet, hoping to Lure Mr. Rowe to our lovely state. We all know that Arizona is rich in mineral deposits but the Four Peaks Amethyst mine is has the unique distinction of being the last operating Amethyst mine in north America.

What is amethyst? It’s a Purple colored variety of Quartz that is used often in southwestern art and jewelry. It’s nice to know that a store as prominent as Sami Fine Jewelry still takes time to explore its suppliers like this. At Cambridge properties we too believe that you can’t truly know what your selling if you don’t know where it comes from. We love learning about places like the four peaks Amethyst mine, it’s just another reminder that we live in a state that has more than meets the eye.


What is your favorite neighborhood?

The Valley has started to come into it’s own. The different areas of town have really started to Identify their own cultures and leaders. As the Phoenix area grows and expands we would love to hear your favorite things about either the neighborhood you live in or want to live in.

 

What’s your favorite resturant? Store owner? Is there a little business complex you’d like to see revitalized? Cambridge Properties is excited about being your partner in the development and urbanization of Phoenix, we hope you feel the same.

 

 


Saying goodbye to Los Arcos Methodist Church.

The Los Arcos Methodist Church in Scottsdale was not alwasy an architectural oddity in south Scottsdale.  In 1966 construction was finished on this midcentury modern church intended to be a “Church in the marketplace” referring to the nearby Los Arcos mall. (now skysong.)

It’s amazing to think about all of the modern architecture that exploded here in the valley in the 60’s, especially in places of worship. The website Modern Phoenix highlights many of these and more midcentury treasures the valley has to offer.

Sadly the days of Los Arcos are finished, and not in some esotric sense, it’s been demolished. Here are some photos of the demolition. (The congregation however is still alive and well.)

(Here it is with the windows missing.)

(Here showing the aftermath.)

(Almost mockingly, the sign has been left intact.)

Progress can be a good thing, but here in the west we are all too quick to scrap something and start over. Los Arcos may not have been had great attendance but it’s design speaks of a time not long ago, when Scottsdale was just beginning to find it’s voice. It was churches and buildings like Los Arcos that inspired people to think of Scottsdale as the modern city we know today. It’s worth taking a second to remember that without reminders of our past, we may loose sight of our future.


Woolworth Brownstone in NYC just listed for 90million.

You heard the right, 90,000,000. Sure the Woolworth mansion is 18000sqft and 7 stories tall but when you consider that the Chateau on Central Brownstones start at 1.5, you realize exactly how much location factors into price.

The Chateau on Central residences were designed with east coast style convenience in mind. When you see listings like the Woolworth mansion and really any other brownstone in New York you realize just how lucky we are to be able to have Brownstone luxury at Arizona prices.


Find out how they they keep Old Town Scottsdale old.

Did you know there is a planning council who’s soul purpose is to maintain the rustic look and feel of Old Town Scottsdale? Made up of business owners and community members the Old Town Merchants association is committed to preserving Old Town Scottsdale vintage charm.

With the new crop of High Rise residential towers and lofts in Old Town Scottsdale, it’s going to be interesting to see how they merge new and old in the years to come.